System and Method for Facilitating Access to a Secured Area

Abstract:

In one aspect, a portable electronic device is provided for accessing a secured area to deliver a package therein. The portable electronic device includes a sensor configured to detect an indicium of the package and communication circuitry configured to communicate a message to a server computer associated with the package upon the sensor detecting the indicium. The communication circuitry is further configured to receive delivery information from the server computer, the delivery information including at least a location of the secured area. The portable electronic device further includes a processor operatively coupled to the sensor and the communication circuitry. The processor is configured to cause, via the communication circuitry, the movable barrier operator to open a movable barrier associated with the secured area.


Publication Number: US20190244448

Publication Date: 2019-08-08

Application Number: 16383093

Applicant Date: 2019-04-12

International Class:

    G07C 9/00

Inventors: Maurien Alamin Stephen Charles Coates Jordan Ari Farber Jeremy Eugene Jenkins Ghazi Tahir Khan Erik James Manninen David R. Morris Corey Jevon Norman Sapta Gireesh Pudipeddi Cory Jon Sorice Gregory John Stanek

Inventors Address: Vernon Hills,IL,US Elmhurst,IL,US Oak Brook,IL,US St. Charles,IL,US Chicago,IL,US Westmont,IL,US Glenview,IL,US Villa Park,IL,US Hoffman Estates,IL,US LaGrange,IL,US Aurora,IL,US

Applicators: The Chamberlain Group, Inc.

Applicators Address: Oak Brook IL US

Assignee:


Claims:

1. A portable electronic device for accessing a secured area to deliver a package therein, the portable electronic device comprising:a sensor configured to detect an indicium of the package;communication circuitry configured to communicate a message including information representative of the indicium to a server computer associated with the package;the communication circuitry further configured to receive delivery information from the server computer, the delivery information including at least a location of the secured area; anda processor operatively coupled to the sensor and the communication circuitry, the processor configured to cause, via the communication circuitry, the movable barrier operator to open a movable barrier associated with the secured area.

2. The portable electronic device of claim 1 further comprising a user interface operatively coupled to the processor and configured to receive a user input requesting access to the secured area; andthe processor is further configured to cause, via the communication circuitry, the movable barrier operator to open the movable barrier associated with the secured area based on receipt by the user interface of the user input.

3. The portable electronic device of claim 1 wherein the communication circuitry is further configured to receive location data and the processor is further configured to:determine a location of the portable electronic device based at least in part on the location data; andcause the communication circuitry to communicate the location of the portable electronic device to the server computer to authenticate a proximity of the portable electronic device to the secured area.

4. The portable electronic device of claim 3 wherein the processor is further configured to cause, via the communication circuitry, the movable barrier operator to open the movable barrier upon the proximity being less than a predetermined proximity to the location of the secured area.

5. The portable electronic device of claim 1 wherein the communication circuitry is further configured to receive location data and the processor is further configured to:determine a location of the portable electronic device based at least in part on the location data;determine a proximity of the portable electronic device to the secured area by comparing the location of the portable electronic device and the location of the secured area; andcause, via the communication circuitry, the movable barrier operator to close the movable barrier upon the proximity being greater than a predetermined proximity from the location of the secured area.

6. The portable electronic device of claim 1 further comprising a user interface operatively coupled to the processor, the user interface configured to display a graphical representation of a package delivery location in the secured area.

7. The portable electronic device of claim 1, wherein the processor is further configured to cause the communication circuitry to communicate, to the server computer, a temporal indicator associated with the communication circuitry initiating operation of the movable barrier operator, the temporal indicator configured to permit the server computer to compare the temporal indicator to an authorized temporal period.

8. The portable electronic device of claim 1, wherein the communication circuitry is further configured to receive a wireless signal associated with the secured area, the processor further configured to cause, via the communication circuitry, the movable barrier operator to open a movable barrier associated with the secured area upon receipt by the communication circuitry of the wireless signal.

9. The portable electronic device of claim 1, wherein the sensor includes a camera and the communication circuitry includes a cellular network interface.

10. A method for accessing a secured area to deliver a package using a portable electronic device, the method comprising:detecting, using a sensor of the portable electronic device, an indicium of the package;communicating, by communication circuitry of the portable electronic device, a message including information representative of the indicium to a server computer associated with the package;receiving, via the communication circuitry of the portable electronic device, delivery information from the server computer including at least a location of the secured area; andcausing, via the communication circuitry of the portable electronic device, a movable barrier operator to open a movable barrier associated with the secured area.

11. The method of claim 10 further comprising receiving, at a user interface of the portable electronic device, a user input requesting access to the secured area; andwherein causing the movable barrier operator to open the movable barrier includes causing the movable barrier operator to open the movable barrier based on the user interface receiving the user input.

12. The method of claim 10 further comprising:receiving, via the communication circuitry, location data;determining a location of the portable electronic device based at least in part on the location data; andcommunicating the location of the portable electronic device to the server computer to authenticate a proximity of the portable electronic device to the secured area.

13. The method of claim 12 further comprising communicating, via the communication circuitry, a state change request to the movable barrier operator to cause the movable barrier operator to open the movable barrier upon the proximity being less than a predetermined proximity to the location of the secured area.

14. The method of claim 10 further comprising:receiving, via the communication circuitry, location data;determining a location of the portable electronic device based at least in part on the location data; andcausing, via the communication circuitry, the movable barrier operator to close the movable barrier upon the proximity being greater than a predetermined proximity from the location of the secured area.

15. The method of claim 10 further comprising displaying, via a user interface of the portable electronic device, a graphical representation of a package delivery location in the secured area.

16. The method of claim 10 wherein causing, via the communication circuitry of the portable electronic device, the movable barrier operator to open the movable barrier includes communicating, to the server computer, a temporal indicator associated with the communication circuitry causing the movable barrier operator to open the movable barrier, the temporal indicator configured to permit the server computer to compare the temporal indicator to an authorized temporal time period.

17. The method of claim 10 further comprising:receiving, via the communication circuitry, a wireless signal associated with the secured area;wherein causing the movable barrier operator to open the movable barrier includes causing the movable barrier operator to open the movable barrier upon the communication circuitry receiving the wireless signal.

18. The method of claim 10 wherein the sensor includes a camera and detecting the indicium of the package includes determining the indicium from an image captured by the camera.

19. A movable barrier operator associated with a secured area, the movable barrier operator comprising:a motor configured to be coupled to a movable barrier;communication circuitry; anda processor operatively coupled with the motor and the communication circuitry, the processor having a learning mode wherein the processor facilitates learning of a transmitter upon the communication circuitry receiving a radio frequency control signal from the transmitter;the processor configured to cause the motor to move the movable barrier from a closed position to an open position upon the communication circuitry receiving a state change request from a computing device, the state change request associated with a delivery to the secured area; andthe processor configured to inhibit learning of a new transmitter via the learning mode upon the communication circuitry receiving the state change request from the computing device.

20. The movable barrier operator of claim 19 further comprising a user interface configured to receive a learning mode request;wherein the processor is configured to enter the learning mode in response to the user interface receiving the learning mode request.

21. The movable barrier operator of claim 19, wherein the processor is further configured to cause the motor to move the movable barrier from the open position to the closed position upon completion of the delivery; andthe processor is configured to, upon the motor moving the movable barrier to the closed position, re-enable the learning mode.

22. The movable barrier operator of claim 19, wherein the processor is further configured to cause the communication circuitry to communicate a notification to a user device in response to an attempt to cause the processor to enter the learning mode subsequent to the state change request associated with the delivery.

23. The movable barrier operator of claim 19, wherein the processor is configured to inhibit learning of the new transmitter by disabling the learning mode.

24. An operator enhancement device comprising:communication circuitry configured to communicate via radio frequency signals with a plurality of movable barrier operator types that use different communication protocols;the communication circuitry configured to receive a state change request from a remote computing device; anda processor operatively coupled to the communication circuitry, the processor configured to operate the communication circuitry to communicate with a movable barrier operator and cause the movable barrier operator to move an associated movable barrier from a closed position to an open position upon the communication circuitry receiving the state change request;the processor is configured to inhibit the movable barrier operator from learning a new transmitter by causing the communication circuitry to transmit a radio frequency signal to overwhelm the movable barrier operator.

25. The operator enhancement device of claim 24 wherein the communication circuitry is configured to communicate with the remote computing device via a network, and the state change request indicates that the state change request is associated with a delivery.

26. The operator enhancement device of claim 24 further comprising a memory configured to store a data array including at least one learned transmitter ID; andwherein the processor is configured to:determine a transmitter ID of a radio frequency signal from the new transmitter;compare the transmitter ID to the at least one learned transmitter ID; andcause the communication circuitry to transmit the radio frequency signal to overwhelm the movable barrier operator in response to the transmitter ID of the radio frequency signal from the new transmitter not corresponding to any of the at least one learned transmitter ID.

27. The operator enhancement device of claim 24 further comprising a memory configured to store a data array including transmitter IDs of previously detected, but unlearned, transmitters; andwherein the processor is configured to:determine a transmitter ID of a radio frequency signal from the new transmitter;compare the transmitter ID to the transmitter IDs of the previously detected, but unlearned, transmitters; andtransmit the radio frequency signal to overwhelm the movable barrier operator in response to the transmitter ID of the radio frequency signal from the new transmitter not corresponding to the transmitter IDs of the previously detected, but unlearned, transmitters.

28. The operator enhancement device of claim 24 wherein the processor is configured to:determine a signal strength of a radio frequency signal from the new transmitter; andcause the communication circuitry to transmit the radio frequency signal to overwhelm the movable barrier operator only if the signal strength is above a predetermined signal strength threshold.

Descriptions:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application is a continuation-in-part of U.S. application Ser. No. 16/050,923 filed Jul. 31, 2018 and claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Patent App. No. 62/659,535, filed Apr. 18, 2018 and U.S. Provisional Patent App. No. 62/540,047, filed Aug. 1, 2017, which are hereby incorporated by reference herein in their entireties.

FIELD

This disclosure relates to movable barrier operators and, more specifically, to a system and method for facilitating a grant of conditional, temporary authorization to operate a movable barrier operator associated with a secured area.

BACKGROUND

Movable barrier operators, such as garage door openers, secure areas and move barriers in response to received signals from transmitters. Different kinds of transmitters, such as portable transmitters or stationary transmitters, may be used to operate moveable barrier operators. One type of a stationary transmitter is a keypad mounted near the movable barrier.

In one prior system, a user orders a product online and a delivery service is able to open a user's garage door to complete an unattended delivery of the ordered product because a computer of the delivery service can communicate with a home automation system associated with the garage door opener. Temporary or one-time access can be granted to the delivery person or associate by establishing and providing a temporary or one-time use entry code. The delivery person enters the one-time use entry code into an outdoor, stationary keypad near the garage door, and the code is communicated to the garage door opener such that the garage door opener opens the garage door. The one-time use entry code differs from the code used by the residents to operate the moveable barrier operator. Temporary or one-time access may be given to other types of guests besides delivery associates, such as contractors or visitors.

While temporary or one-time use codes limit the number of times and/or amount of time during which a guest can open the barrier, temporary or one-time use codes do not limit access to the secured area once the guest is beyond the moveable barrier. For example, access to an attached garage provides access to a passageway door of the garage which leads to an interior of the associated house or multi-tenant building. In some instances, a resident or a home owner may wish to give a guest access to the garage without permitting the guest to open the passageway door. Accordingly, the passageway door should be kept locked, necessitating the resident to carry a key, fob, keycard, or the like. Additionally, if multiple guests are granted temporary or one-time entry codes, some may have to be given keys to the passageway door if access to the house is necessary.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGSFIG. 1 is a perspective view of a garage having a movable barrier operator and a passageway door;FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the passageway door of FIG. 1 having a passageway door lock on an interior side of the door;FIG. 3 is a block diagram of a system including the movable barrier operator and the passageway door lock of FIGS. 1 and 2;FIG. 4A is a perspective view of a passageway door lock;FIG. 4B is a perspective view of the lock of FIG. 4A with a housing of the lock transparent to show internal components of the lock;FIG. 4C is a perspective view of drive elements of the lock of FIGS. 4A and 4B;FIG. 5A is a perspective view of a passageway door lock;FIG. 5B is a perspective view of the lock of FIG. 5A with a housing of the lock transparent to show internal components of the lock;FIG. 6 is a perspective view of internal components of a passageway door lock;FIG. 7 is a perspective view of a passageway door lock;FIG. 8 is a perspective view of a passageway door lock of a passageway door with a bolt of the passageway door lock located within the door;FIG. 9 is a perspective view of an electric strike for a passageway door;FIGS. 10A-10B are a schematic diagram of a delivery services system for facilitating delivery of a package to a garage;FIGS. 11A-11G illustrate example screenshots of an application used by a homeowner or resident in the delivery services system of FIGS. 10A-10B;FIGS. 12A-12H illustrate example screenshots of an application used by a delivery associate in the delivery services system of FIGS. 10A-10B;FIG. 13 is a schematic diagram of an operator enhancement device communicatively coupled to a garage door opener to control operation of the garage door opener; andFIG. 14 is a flow chart of a process to inhibit learning of a new transmitter to a garage door operator.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

In accordance with one aspect of the present disclosure, a system is provided for controlling access to a secured area having a first barrier and a second barrier. The system includes a moveable barrier operator configured to control movement of the first barrier, such as a garage door, and a lock configured to secure the second barrier, such as a passageway door. In one form, the moveable barrier operator is a door operator (also known as a garage door opener, garage door operator, or GDO) and the passageway door is a door leading from the garage to an adjacent area or attached structure, such as a house. The system receives a control signal including a code from a remote control. The remote control may be a wireless transmitter such as a visor-mounted transmitter, a fixed transmitter, such as a keypad, or a portable electronic computing device, such as a smartphone. The system authenticates the signal to determine whether the received signal is a primary signal (associated with a resident) or a secondary signal (associated with a guest) based at least in part on the code (e.g., a fixed identification (ID) code that uniquely identifies the remote control or transmitter) of the signal. The primary signal is associated with a first level of access that permits a user to pass through both the garage door and the passageway door. The secondary signal is associated with a second level of access that permits a user to pass through the garage door but not the passageway door. As such, the system opens the garage door and unlocks the passageway door in response to a primary signal, and the system opens the garage door and locks the passageway door in response to a secondary signal. In some forms, the movable barrier operator moves the garage door a first distance (e.g., fully opens the garage door) in response to a primary signal and opens the garage door a second, shorter distance (e.g., just far enough to slide in a package for delivery) in response to a secondary signal. The secondary signal may include information regarding how far the movable barrier operator should open the garage door. Thus, the open position may be a fully open position or a partially open position according to the situation.

In some forms, the type of signal is determined by the movable barrier operator. The signal may be sent to the movable barrier operator directly from the remote control, such as if the remote control is a visor-mounted transmitter. Alternatively, the signal may be sent to the garage door operator indirectly such as if the remote control is a smartphone. For example, a user may use an application running on her smartphone to send a state change request to cause the movable barrier operator to open or close the garage door. The smartphone sends the state change request to a cloud-based computing device such as a server computer. The server computer determines whether the smartphone is associated with a resident or a guest, and sends either a primary signal or the secondary signal to the movable barrier operator.

If the movable barrier operator receives a primary signal, the movable barrier operator transmits a signal that causes a lock of the passageway door to unlock. In some forms, the movable barrier operator transmits a signal directly to the passageway door lock. Alternatively, the movable barrier operator and passageway door lock are both communicatively coupled to a common local communication hub. The operator transmits a signal to a server computer via the local communication hub and the server computer sends another signal through the local communication hub to the passageway door lock to control the passageway door lock.

If the movable barrier operator receives a secondary signal, the movable barrier operator transmits a signal that causes the passageway door lock to become locked. In one form, the passageway lock includes a sensor configured to determine if the lock is in a locked state or unlocked state. The state of the passageway lock may be transmitted directly or indirectly from the passageway lock to the movable barrier operator. The movable barrier operator analyzes the transmitted signal to check the state of the passageway lock and determine if the state of the passageway lock needs to be changed. The analysis of the transmitted signal may include decrypting the transmitted signal. The moveable barrier operator or the server computer transmits a lock or unlock command to the lock directly or indirectly if the lock is not in the desired state. Further, the state of the lock may be stored locally such as in a memory of the lock, the operator, or a local hub. In another embodiment, the state of the lock is stored on a remote server computer.

In alternative forms, the determination of whether a control signal is a primary signal or a secondary signal is made by a device other than the movable barrier operator, such as a remote server computer. For example, a smartphone transmits a control signal to the server computer. The server computer determines whether the signal is a primary signal or a secondary signal and sends actuation signals to the moveable barrier operator and passageway door lock as needed to effectuate the level of access associated with the control signal.

Referring now to FIG. 1, a garage 14 having a movable barrier operator system 10 is provided. The movable barrier operator system 10 includes a movable barrier operator 12, such as a garage door opener, mounted within a secured area, such as a garage 14. More specifically, the movable barrier operator 12 is mounted to a ceiling 16 of the garage 14 and includes a rail 18 extending therefrom with a releasable trolley 20 attached having an arm 22 extending to a multiple paneled garage door 24 positioned for movement along a pair of door tracks 26 and 28. The movable barrier operator 12 has a motor coupled to the door 24 by the trolley 20 and arm 22, by which the motor moves the door 24. The system 10 includes remote controls such as hand-held transmitter units 30, 31 configured to send signals for reception by communication circuitry through an antenna 32 of the movable barrier operator 12. The remote controls may also include an external control pad 34, with a button or buttons thereon, that is positioned on the outside of the garage 14. The external control pad 34 communicates signals via radio frequency transmission for reception by the antenna 32 of the movable barrier operator 12. A switch module 39 is mounted on a wall of the garage 14. The switch module 39 is connected to the movable barrier operator 12 by one or more wires 39A although the switch module 39 may alternatively communicate with the movable barrier operator wirelessly or via a combination of wired and wireless signals. The switch module 39 includes a light switch 39B, a lock switch 39C, and a command switch 39D. An optical emitter 42 is connected via a power and signal line 44 to the movable barrier operator 12. An optical detector 46 is connected via a wire 48 to the movable barrier operator 12. Alternatively, at least one of the optical emitter 42 and the optical detector 46 may communicate wirelessly with the movable barrier operator. Furthermore, the optical emitter 42 and the optical detector 46 may be combined as a single unit known in the art as a retroreflector.

The movable barrier operator system 10 includes a wired or wireless camera 17 situated to capture security data such as pictures, video, and/or audio within the garage 14. The camera 17 may be configured to continuously capture security data. Alternatively, the camera 17 captures security data at certain times. For example, the camera 17 may be configured to start capturing security data when the movable barrier operator system 10 opens or begins to open the garage door 24. The camera 17 continues capturing security data until the garage door 24 is closed or a predetermined amount of time after the garage door 24 is closed. In further examples, the camera 17 is configured to start capturing security data in response to the system 10 determining that a received control signal is a secondary control signal but not in response to a determination that a received control signal is a primary signal.

In some forms, the camera 17 is remotely movable such that a user viewing a video stream from the camera 17 via a wireless device, such as a smartphone, can adjust the camera 17 to change the field of view. The moveable barrier operator system 10 includes an adjustable indicator 19 for indicating a position within the garage 14. The indicator 19 may be integral with or independent from the moveable barrier operator 12. The indicator 19 projects light, such as a cone of light, to illuminate an area. For example, the indicator 19 may include one or more lightbulbs or LEDs directed to form a shape such as a cone, a pyramid, a circle, or a rectangle on a surface such as the floor of the garage 14. Alternatively or additionally, the indicator 19 includes a laser to form one or more shapes on a surface such as a small circle, a rectangle, and/or an arrow on the floor of the garage 14. The indicator 19 may alternatively or additionally include a speaker and/or a display screen to indicate the desired drop-off location.

The indicator 19 may be used to assist in parking a vehicle within the garage 14. Further, the indicator 19 may be used to indicate a point or illuminated area in the garage 14 for delivery associates to drop or otherwise deposit or place packages or parcels. In some forms, the indicator 19 includes one or more servo motors and is remotely controllable such that the user can use, for example, an application running on the user's smartphone to adjust the indicator 19 in real-time to indicate a desired location for a package within the garage 14 to a delivery associate. The moveable barrier operator 12 may store programmed orientations for the indicator 19 and may adjust the orientation of the indicator 19 based on the operation of the movable barrier operator system 10. For example, the movable barrier operator 12 uses a first stored orientation of the indicator 19 when the user enters the garage 14 to aid in parking. The movable barrier operator 12 uses a second stored orientation of the indicator 19 when a delivery associate enters the garage 14 to indicate a delivery location. Once the delivery associate has delivered the package in the garage 14, the indicator 19 reverts back to the first orientation to assist in parking within the garage 14. In operation, the indicator 19 may be operated to indicate the stored desired location in response to a control signal being authenticated as a secondary signal, but not in response to a control signal being authenticated as a primary signal.

In another embodiment, the user may specify package delivery location by having the movable barrier operator 12 detect a specific action performed by the user. For example, the movable barrier operator 12 may include one or more microphones and the movable barrier operator 12 is configured to use the microphones for voice recognition and/or sound localization. As an example, the movable barrier operator 12 may be configured to detect the user speaking a trigger word or phrase when the user is within the garage 14 such as deliver here! followed by stomping her foot twice at a spot on a floor of the garage 14. The movable barrier operator 12 may detect the desired location using audio sensors (e.g., triangulating position using microphones) and/or using optical position sensors. The movable barrier operator 12 may then operate the indicator 19 to indicate the desired location when the delivery associate enters the garage 14. In some forms, the moveable barrier operator 12 further includes a speaker and/or a microphone such that verbal communications can be exchanged between a delivery associate within the garage 14 and a remote user.

The garage 14 includes a passageway door 49 having hardware 47, such as a doorknob and/or deadbolt. The door 49 separates the garage 14 from an adjacent area or attached structure, such as a house, that is desired to be secured in certain instances. The door 49 has an exterior surface 49A facing the garage 14 and an interior surface 49B facing the house. FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the interior side 49B of the door 49. A passageway door lock 50 is mounted adjacent the door 49 such that a bolt 52 of the lock 50 may obstruct the door 49 by inhibiting an inward swing of the door 49, thereby preventing the door 49 from being opened. The movable barrier operator 12 is in communication with the lock 50 and may cause automatic locking of the lock 50 in response to a guest such as a delivery associate opening the garage door 24. In one form, the lock 50 includes a manual actuator 51 enabling a user to manually shift the bolt 52 between unlocked and locked positions and open the door 49. The lock 50 is mounted to a door jamb 45 associated with the door 49 such that the bolt 52 extends along a portion of the door's interior surface 49B. In one form, neither the door 49 nor the jamb 45 need to be modified, such as by cutting mortises or cavities, to receive the bolt 52 or the lock 50.

A passageway lock system 100 is provided as a block diagram in FIG. 3 and includes the moveable barrier operator 12 and the lock 50. The moveable barrier operator 12 includes wireless communication circuitry 11, such as a receiver and transmitter or a transceiver. The moveable barrier operator 12 also includes a controller 13 that includes a processor and a non-transitory computer readable memory.

The wireless communication circuitry 11 may be configured to communicate over one or more frequencies, such as standard 300 MHz-400 MHz frequencies, and one or more protocols, such as Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, ZigBee, or infrared (IR). In one form, the wireless communication circuitry 11 includes a transceiver (or a separate receiver and transceiver) for communicating via 300 MHz-400 MHz signals with a garage door opener transmitter, as well as a Bluetooth and/or Wi-Fi transceiver (or a separate transmitter and receiver) for communicating with the lock 50 and/or a gateway 60. The gateway 60 may provide wireless access to an external network, such as the internet. The gateway 60 may be a router, access point or a smart house hub. Although the lock 50 is shown as communicating with the moveable barrier operator 12, the lock 50 may additionally or alternatively communicate with gateway 60. In an example, the lock 50 and the moveable barrier operator 12 communicate indirectly with each other via gateway 60 and/or a cloud (e.g., network-based service) that is instantiated or otherwise executed by a remote entity such as a network device or server computer.

In operation, the movable barrier operator 12 receives a signal. The signal can be transmitted from one of multiple remote controls, including the keypad 34, the portable transmitters 30, 31, or another remote control such as a wireless device 61. The wireless device 61 may be a smartphone or tablet communicatively coupled to the movable barrier operator 12 by the gateway 60. For example, a user may send open or close commands to the movable barrier operator 12 using an application running on the user's smartphone. The user's smartphone communicates with a remote resource 62, such as a server computer, via a cellular telephone system and the internet. In response to receiving the communication from the user's smartphone, the remote resource 62 sends a signal to the movable barrier operator 12 via the internet. The signal may include data representing the identity of the smartphone and/or user and a code associated with the moveable barrier operator 12. If the signal is sent using the keypad 34, the keypad 34 sends a code entered by a user to the moveable barrier operator 12. A controller 13 of the moveable barrier operator 12 parses and decrypts the signal to determine if the code(s) are valid, and determines the permissions associated with the identified remote control and/or user. Among the permissions determined by the moveable barrier operator 12 is whether to unlock the lock 50 to give access to the house.

If an identified user/remote control is permitted access to the garage 14 and the house, the moveable barrier operator 12 transmits a signal 11A to the door lock 50 containing a command to unlock the passageway door 49. The door lock 50 receives the command at communication circuitry 54, which may include a receiver and a transmitter, and actuates the bolt 52 (FIG. 2) into an unlocked or retracted position. In some forms, the signal 11A transmitted to the door lock 50 is encrypted, and the door lock 50 includes a controller 55 configured to decrypt the signal. The signal 11A may be sent via wired or wireless approaches.

If the identified user/remote control is permitted access to the garage 14 but is not permitted access to the house, the moveable barrier operator 12 transmits the signal 11A containing a lock command to the door lock 50. The door lock 50 receives the signal 11A at the communication circuitry 54 and in response, actuates the bolt 52 into a locked or extended position. The movable barrier operator 12 thereby causes the door lock 50 to secure the door 49 (FIGS. 1 and 2) before or concurrent with the movable barrier operator 12 starting to open the garage door 24. If the movable barrier operator 12 receives the signal 11A from a remote control that is unauthorized, the movable barrier operator 12 does not open the garage door 24.

FIGS. 4A-4C illustrate a passageway door lock 150 configured to secure a passageway door 149. The lock 150 includes a bolt 152 shiftable in direction 152A to an extended position to obstruct opening of the door 149 when the door 140 is closed. The lock 150 is mounted adjacent the door 149 by a mounting plate 153 secured to a door jamb 143. In one form, the mounting plate 153 is secured to the jamb 143 by a plurality of fasteners such as screws or nails long enough to extend into a structural or supporting member (e.g., a metal or wood stud) adjacent to the door 149. The bolt 152, mounting plate 153, and other components of the lock 150 may be made of steel, alloy or other material having high tensile strength.

With reference to FIG. 4B, the lock 150 includes a rotary or linear actuator such as an electric motor 156 configured to drive or actuate the bolt 152. The electric motor 156 is operable to drive the bolt 152 in direction 152A to extended, locked position or in direction 152B to a retracted, unlocked position. The electric motor 156 is powered by a power source 157, such as a battery. In some forms, the lock 150 is additionally or alternatively wired to the electrical system of the house or associated structure. The motor 156 is controlled by a controller 158 and/or associated circuitry. A receiver 154 is communicatively coupled to the controller 158. In operation, the receiver 154 receives a signal from the moveable barrier operator 12 and/or the gateway 60 and transmits the received signal to the controller 158. The controller 158 analyzes the signal to determine whether to operate the motor 156. The controller 158 then connects the motor 156 to the power source 157 such that the electric motor 156 drives the bolt 152 to the locked or unlocked position.

In one form, the lock 150 includes a slip clutch 160 as shown in FIG. 4C. The slip clutch 160 includes a metal plate 162 coupled to a drive shaft of the motor 156. When the motor 156 is powered, the motor 156 rotates the plate 162. A magnet 164 is mounted to the plate 162. The magnet 164 is coupled magnetically to a pinion gear or sprocket 166 that engages a toothed rack 166A fixed to the bolt 152. In standard operation, rotating the plate 162 causes the magnet 164 and, in turn, the sprocket 166 to rotate. Teeth of the rotating sprocket 166 mesh with complementary teeth of the rack 166A and cause the bolt 152 to be driven inwardly in direction 152B or outwardly in direction 152A. However, if force is applied to the bolt 152 in direction 152B, such as by a manual actuator (e.g., actuator 51 of FIG. 2), the bolt 152 imparts torque on the sprocket 166 causing the magnet 164 to rotate or slip relative to the plate 162. The slipping allows the bolt 152 to be moved without turning the driveshaft of the motor 156 and possibly damaging the motor 156. The slipping permits a person inside of the house to manually shift the bolt 152 to an unlocked position to open the door 149.

Another lock 250 is illustrated in FIGS. 5A-5B. The lock 250 includes a linear actuator 256. The linear actuator 256 is operatively coupled to the bolt 252 by a linkage including links 268, 269. The links 268, 269 are pivotably connected such that they convert the vertical movement of a piston 256A of the actuator 256 into horizontal movement of the bolt 252. One end of the link 268 is coupled to the bolt 252, such that the vertical movement of the piston 256A actuates the bolt 252 between an extended locked position and a retracted unlocked position.

The passageway door lock 350, as shown in FIG. 6, includes a motor 356 configured to rotate a slip clutch 360. The slip clutch 360 is operatively coupled to a bolt 352 such that rotation of the slip clutch 360 moves the bolt 352 between locked and unlocked positions. The bolt 352 has a cylindrical shape with rounded edges. The rounded shape of the bolt 352 decreases the likelihood of scratching the paint or finish of a door.

FIG. 7 illustrates a passageway door lock 450 having a bolt 452 operatively coupled to a manual actuator 451. The lock 450 includes a slip clutch, such as the magnetic slip clutch 160 described above, allowing the bolt 452 to be manually actuated without damaging a drive motor of the lock 450. The lock 450 includes a mounting plate 453 having predetermined locations for receiving screws for mounting the lock 450 adjacent to a door.

FIG. 8 illustrates a passageway door lock 550 of a door 553. As shown, the door lock 550 is configured to adapt or augment an existing deadbolt-type lock by coupling with or replacing a portion of the deadbolt-type lock, particularly an indoor mechanism. For instance, an indoor-accessible mechanism of a deadbolt lock such as a thumbturn or a keyed cylinder (of a double cylinder deadbolt) may be removed and replaced with the door lock 550 such that the remaining portions of the existing deadbolt lock (e.g., the keyed outdoor cylinder and the latch/bolt) couple and function with the door lock 550. Installation of the door lock 550 may entail replacement of a bolt 552, however the bolt 552 may be a portion of the existing deadbolt-type lock that remains independent of installation of the door lock 550. Bolt 552 is operatively coupled to a manual actuator 551 illustrated as a thumbturn. The bolt 552 is located within the door when in a retracted state. When actuated, the bolt 552 extends from the door and enters a cavity in the door frame, as in traditional deadbolt locks. The passageway door lock 550 includes a wireless communication circuit 554 for receiving signals to control the actuation of the bolt 552. When the wireless communication circuit 554 receives a signal, the signal is transmitted to a controller 558 which operates a motor 556 to move the bolt 552. The passageway door lock 550 further includes a power source, such as one or more batteries. The bolt 552 extends through an opening of a plate 553. Passageway door locks 150, 250, 350, 450, and 550 operate in a manner similar to the passageway door lock 50 and may be utilized in the system 100.

In some forms, locks other than deadbolts may be used in the system 100 to secure the passageway door. FIG. 9 illustrates an electric strike 650 for securing a passageway door, such as the passageway door 49 of FIG. 1. The electric strike 650 includes a mounting plate or strike plate 653 for mounting the electric strike 650 to the door jamb 643. A movable keeper or latchbar 652 is configured to releasably secure the passageway door in a closed position. The latchbar 652 is actuated to move from the secured position, as shown in FIG. 9, to an unsecured position in order to release the passageway door. The electric strike contains an internal power source, motor or actuator, and wireless receiver similar to those described in the embodiments above.

As with the locks described above, the electric strike 650 is remotely controlled by at least one of the movable barrier operator 12 or a remote device, such as a server computer or a wireless device via the internet. In operation, a control signal is transmitted to the electric strike 650 which causes the electric strike 650 to move the latchbar 652 into the secured or unsecured position.

Other types of locks may be used in the system 100. For example, a lock that fits over a thumb turn of an existing, conventional deadbolt lock to operate the deadbolt may be utilized. As another example, a lock that replaces an interior-side thumb turn of a conventional deadbolt lock while keeping the internal deadbolt mechanism and exterior keyed cylinder may be utilized.

A user or administrator grants access to the garage 14 by giving out temporary or limited access codes. In some forms, the limited access code is in the form of a code to be entered into the keypad 34. In another form, the limited access code is programmed into a portable transmitter 30, 31 or the wireless device 61. In yet another form, the limited access code is programmed into the movable barrier operator 12 in addition to programming the limited access code (or a complementary code) into a portable transmitter 30, 31 or the wireless device 61. In other instances a remote resource 62 (e.g., server computer) transmits or otherwise communicates the limited access code to a portable transmitter 30, 31 or the wireless device 61 upon request after performance of a security measure such as at least one of verification, authorization, and authentication of the requester. The wireless device 61 communicates with the remote resource 62, which may be a server computer or a plurality of server computers forming a cloud, which in turn communicates with the moveable barrier operator 12 via the local gateway 60. A limited access code may be one or more codes output from a rolling code encryption process used by the moveable barrier operator 12. Accordingly, the movable barrier operator 12 may provide the remote resource 62 with a rolling code that is generated or output based on a query or request such that the rolling code can be relayed to a portable transmitter 30, 31 or the wireless device 61 for example after performance of a security measure.

The moveable barrier operator 12 includes memory (e.g., integral/unitary or otherwise onboard the controller 13 in FIG. 3 or separate/distinct from the controller 13) storing the limited access codes and associating them with specific permissions. In some forms, the permissions limit the temporal periods, e.g., times of day and/or days during which the moveable barrier operator 12 will open the garage door 24 in response to receiving the limited access codes. The permissions also indicate whether or not the code grants access to the attached home or structure via the passageway door 49. The operation of the lock 50 and permission to open the door 49 can differ from whether a guest has permission to open the garage door 24. For example, some codes used to enter the garage door 24 can have stored permissions to permit entry into both the garage and the house, in which case the garage door 24 will open and the lock 50 will unlock. Other codes will have stored permissions limited to the garage, in which case the garage door 24 will open and the lock 50 will lock. In operation, a user having administrator rights may establish and/or provide access codes granting only garage access permission to delivery associates such that they can leave packages in the garage 14. Different access codes may be established and/or given to maids, contractors, guests, or others to control when such individuals are permitted to enter the garage 14 and whether the guest can open the door 49 to the adjacent area.

As described above, the moveable barrier operator 12 receives a signal and checks a code of the signal against a stored table of permissions. If the code grants permission to enter the garage 14 and the home, the movable barrier operator 12 or remote resource 62 transmits an unlock signal to the lock 50 at the passageway door 49 and the movable barrier operator 12 opens the garage door 22. If permission to enter the home is not granted but the guest can access the garage 14, the movable barrier operator 12 or remote resource 62 transmits a lock signal to the lock 50 and the movable barrier operator 12 opens the garage 14.

In addition to the limited access codes, the administrator or another user can create primary codes, such as permanent or resident access codes. The resident access codes can be used at any time and any number of times. When the moveable barrier operator 12 receives a resident access code, the movable barrier operator 12 transmits an unlock signal or causes remote resource 62 to transmit the unlock signal to the lock 50. These resident access codes can later be changed or revoked by the administrator.

The moveable barrier operator 12 may use additional data when determining whether or not to transmit a lock signal (or cause the lock signal to be transmitted e.g., from the remote resource 62) to the lock 50. In one example, the movable barrier operator 12 transmits a lock signal to the lock 50 if no users are at home, if only a single resident is at home, or if only children are at home, but not if adults are at home. The system 100 detects who is at home by, for example, tracking codes entered at the keypad 34, detecting vehicles in the garage 14, and/or identifying wireless devices communicatively coupled to the gateway 60 and/or the movable barrier operator 12. For example, the system 100 may store identifying information of the smartphones of the adults that live in the home. If those smartphones are connected to the gateway 60, they are identified by the movable barrier operator 12 and/or the remote resource 62, and the movable barrier operator 12 does not lock the passageway door lock 50. In alternative forms, the administrator or another user enters schedule information into an application running on her smartphone which is provided to a home automation system associated with the garage 14 and/or the movable barrier operator 12. The schedule information indicates the standard schedule of the users. The movable barrier operator 12 or the remote resource 62 will operate the lock 50 based on whether or not the adults should be home according to the preprogrammed schedule.

In some embodiments, the lock 50 includes one or more sensors configured to detect the position of the bolt 52. The position of the bolt 52 is transmitted to the moveable barrier operator 12 or the remote resource 62 by the lock 50. If the bolt 52 is already in the locked position, the movable barrier operator 12 or the remote resource 62 may not transmit a lock command. The sensor detects when the bolt 52 is actuated. In some forms, the moveable barrier operator 12 creates a log storing times at which the bolt 52 is actuated. This log can be accessed by the administrator or another user. Alternatively or additionally, a signal is transmitted to the wireless device 61 of the administrator when the bolt 52 is actuated. The moveable barrier operator 12 may store a log of received signals from transmitters 30, 31. The log includes identifying information associated with the transmitters 30, 31 and/or access codes and the time at which signals were received. In some forms, the log further includes the time at which a close signal was received at the moveable barrier operator 12 and/or the amount of time between the open and close signal.

The administrator or another user can associate the system 100 with a variety of shipping/delivery companies and/or retailers. In one form, the user inputs a package tracking number associated with a package into an application on her wireless device 61. The remote resource 62 automatically generates an access code for the delivery associate handling the package, and transmits the access code to a server computer of the delivery company and to the moveable barrier operator 12. In some forms, the access code is temporally limited to the estimated expected day and/or time window for delivery provided by a partner cloud 610 (FIG. 10A) described below. Additionally or alternatively, the access code is a one-time code that expires after the access code is used to operate the movable barrier operator 12.

In another form, information identifying the system 100 is input into a retailer account by an administrator or another user. When the administrator or another user makes a purchase from the retailer, the retailer's software automatically generates a temporary access code and transmits the code to the delivery associate and to the moveable barrier operator 12.

With reference to FIGS. 10A-10B, a delivery services system 600 is provided that includes one or more components of the system 100. The system 600 includes the movable barrier operator 12, such as moveable barrier operator systems 12A, 12B, that are communicatively coupled to the internet 603, such as via Wi-Fi connection 601. The system 100 includes the gateway 60 in the form of a gateway 601A, such as a router, access point, or modem, for connecting the Wi-Fi network 601 to the internet 603. Via the internet 603, the moveable barrier operator systems 12A, 12B communicate with the wireless device 60, which may include a first wireless device 700, such as a smartphone, and a second wireless device 800, such as a smartphone, tablet computing device or personal computer. The first and second wireless devices 700, 800 are connected to the internet 603 by the Wi-Fi network 601 or by a cellular network 602. The first wireless device 700 is operated by a user 702, such as the homeowner or a resident, of a structure associated with the garage 14 such as an attached home. The second wireless device 800 is operated by a delivery associate 802. As illustrated, the first wireless device 700 includes a memory 703 and a processor 704 for storing and running a moveable barrier operator application 701. The first wireless device 700 may also include communication circuitry 705, a speaker 706, and a microphone 707. Example screenshots from the moveable barrier operator application 701 are shown in FIGS. 11A-11G and described below. The second wireless device 800 includes a memory 803 and a processor 804 for storing and running a delivery services application 801. The second wireless device 800 may further include a sensor, such as an optical sensor 805 (e.g. camera), communication circuitry 806, and a user interface 807 for receiving a user input. The communication circuitry 806 may include a cellular network interface, a Bluetooth interface, and/or a GPS receiver as some examples. FIGS. 12A-12H provide example screenshots of the delivery services application 801. In one form, the moveable barrier operator application 701 and delivery services application 801 are the same application, and the screens displayed by the application (and the features/functionality thereof) depend on whether an individual signs in with access credentials as the user 702 or the delivery associate 802.

The moveable barrier operator systems 12A, 12B are operatively coupled to garage doors 24, 24 as well as passageway locks 50 of passageway doors 49 as described above. The movable barrier operator systems 12A, 12B may take a variety of forms. For example, the movable barrier operator system 12A in FIG. 10B includes a garage door opener head unit with wireless capability. The movable barrier operator system 12A may include a motor 660, communication circuitry 661 and a processor 662. The movable barrier operator system 12B in FIG. 10B includes a communication hub or operator enhancement device 731 communicatively coupled to one or more movable barrier operators, such as garage door opener head units 732, 733, wherein each garage door opener head unit 732, 733 is coupled to a garage door 24, 24 respectively. One example of the operator enhancement device 731 is the MyQ Smart Garage Hub sold by the Chamberlain Group, Inc. The garage door head units 732, 733 do not, by themselves, have the ability to communicate over a network. The operator enhancement device 731 permits the garage door head units 732, 733 to be monitored and controlled over a network, such as the internet, using a smartphone application or computer internet browser. To this end, the operator enhancement device 731 includes a virtual garage door opener (virtual garage door opener 1 and virtual garage door opener 2) for each of the garage door head units 732, 733. The operator enhancement device 731 also includes a door sensor (DS) 734 associated with each garage door 24, 24 which permits the operator enhancement device 731 to keep track of the status of the garage doors 24, 24. The status of each garage door 24, 24 may include at least one of closed, open, closing, opening, partially open, obstructed, stopped, and reversed. To operate either one of the garage door opener head units 732, 733, the operator enhancement device 731 sends a 300 MHz on-off keying (OOK) signal via the OOK radio 735 of the operator enhancement device 731. The garage door opener head unit 732, 733 to which the OOK signal is directed then operates to change the position of the garage door 24, 24. To operate a light 740 (e.g., a controllable/switched bulb or fixture within the residence to which the garage is attached, or a worklight associated with or integral to either one of the garage door opener head units 732, 733,) the operator enhancement device 731 may send a 900 MHz signal.

The passageway locks 50 may be in the form of or more of the passageway locks 150, 250, 350, 450, 550 discussed above. The moveable barrier operators 12A, 12B are communicatively coupled to the passageway locks 50 to both transmit control signals to the passageway locks 50 as well as receive status signals from the passageway locks 50. Additionally or alternatively, the passageway locks 50 may be in communication with a remote resource 62 such as a server computer (e.g., movable barrier operator cloud 611) via the internet 603 through one or more networks including a wired (e.g., POTS, Ethernet, etc.) network, wireless short-range (e.g., Wi-Fi 601) network, and wireless long-range (e.g., cellular 602) network. The moveable barrier operators 12A, 12B include additional control inputs such as from the obstruction detection components (constituted by optical emitter 42 and optical detector 46), transmitters 30, and the keypad 34.

Regarding FIGS. 10A and 10B, the movable barrier operator system 12A is associated with the garage 14 and the system 600 includes the camera 17 located within the garage 14. The following discussion describes the delivery associate 802 delivering a package 810 to the garage 14 associated with the movable barrier operator system 12A, but it will be appreciated that the user 702 could specify delivery to the garage associated with the movable barrier operator system 12B if so desired. Further, when both movable barrier operator systems 12A, 12B are installed in a common garage 14 but control different garage doors of the garage, the user 702 can utilize the movable barrier operator application 701 to select which movable barrier operator systems 12A, 12B with which the delivery associate 802 interacts.

When the delivery associate 802 is in the garage 14 as shown in FIG. 10A, the camera 17 is communicatively coupled to the first wireless device 700 (e.g., a mobile phone, tablet, etc. of the homeowner, resident or delivery recipient). The camera 17 communicates with the first wireless device 700 either via the internet 603 or, when the first wireless device 700 is local, via the Wi-Fi network 601 or a short range wireless communication protocol, such as Bluetooth or BLE (Bluetooth low energy) connection 708. The camera 17 includes a microphone 17A and speaker 17B to facilitate verbal communication between the delivery associate 802 and the user 702. As described above, the camera 17 may be adjustable, by means of a motor configured to pan and/or tilt the camera and/or a second motor configured to adjust the lens and zoom level of the camera, and the adjustment can be controlled by the user 702 using the application 701.

The network 600 includes one or more cloud-based computing systems such as a partner cloud 610, a movable barrier operator cloud 611, and a media cloud 612. The partner cloud 610 is a cloud-based computing system used by a partner retailer 905 (see FIG. 11B) to store and transmit order information. The partner retailer 905 is a retailer, such as a brick and mortar store, an online retailer, or a peer-to-peer purchasing platform as some examples. The partner retailer 905 sells items to the user 702. The items may be perishable, e.g., groceries or a prepared meal, or non-perishable. The items are packaged in a parcel or package 810 with an identifier. Example identifiers include non-human readable identifiers such as barcodes, QR codes, RFID tags, or NFC tags. The delivery associate 802 retrieves the package 810 from the partner retailer (or from a third-party entity), the delivery associate 802 may then scan the identifier on the package 810 via the optical sensor 805 of the second wireless device 800, and delivers the package 810 to the user's garage 14. The second wireless device 800 is communicatively coupled to the partner cloud 610. The delivery associate 802 acquires information about deliveries, such as the products to be delivered, the pickup location, and the delivery location, via the partner cloud 610 and/or movable barrier operator cloud 611. The moveable barrier operator cloud 611 facilitates communication between moveable barrier operator systems 12A, 12B and the first and second wireless devices 700, 800. The movable barrier operator cloud 611 may also facilitate communication between camera 17, passageway lock 50, and barrier operator systems 12A, 12B as well as the first and second wireless devices 700, 800. The moveable barrier operator cloud 611 may include a server computer or memory device that stores information related to the operation of moveable barrier operator systems 12A, 12B, such as operator status, temporary access codes, authorized transmitter IDs, operation logs, etc. The moveable barrier operator cloud 611 further enables the moveable barrier operator systems 12A, 12B to be operated remotely such as by the first wireless device 700. The media cloud 612 is communicatively coupled to the camera 17. The media cloud 612 stores security data captured by the camera 17 such as images, videos, and/or audio, such as videos captured during deliveries. The media cloud 612 may be configured with instructions to perform media processing and/or analysis including one or more of facial recognition, two- or three-dimensional object recognition, and the like. In some forms, the information described above as being stored on two or more of the clouds can be combined onto a single cloud-based computing system, such as the data stored on the moveable barrier operator cloud 611 and the media cloud 612. In still other examples, the information stored on one or more of the clouds 610, 611, 612 may be stored on a single designated server.

Turning to FIGS. 11A-11G, a method is provided for the user 702 to employ the system 600 and the application 701 to schedule a delivery. Although the following method is described with respect to sequential actions or operations, the method may be performed with one or more actions/operations combined, omitted and/or ordered otherwise. As shown in FIG. 11A, the user 702 first selects a desired delivery location 901A, 901B. The user 702 can store multiple locations 901A, 901B in the application 701, such as a primary residence 901A, vacation residence 901B, workplace, or other drop off location. The first time the user 702 uses the application 701, the application 701 enters a setup or configuration mode. In setup, the user 702 can login with an existing user account stored on the moveable barrier operator cloud 611 and associated with the movable barrier operator systems 12A, 12B. Alternatively, the user 702 can create a new account and associate the new account with the barrier operator systems 12A, 12B. The user 702 authorizes delivery associates to remotely actuate one or more of the moveable barrier operator systems 12A, 12B using the moveable barrier operator cloud 611. The setup may be performed through a user interface other than the application 701, such as through a webpage accessed on a personal computer. During setup, the user 702 pairs her account with accounts of partner retailers 905, see FIG. 11B.

By pairing the accounts, the moveable barrier operator cloud 611 may automatically retrieve or receive delivery information from the partner cloud 610 in order to facilitate deliveries. For example, if the user 702 places an order on the website of the partner retailer 905, a system of the partner retailer 905 provides information regarding the order to the moveable barrier operator cloud 611. The provided information includes one or more of item(s) purchased, pick-up location, pick-up time, order status information, and identification information associated with the package 810. The moveable barrier operator cloud 611 stores delivery preferences of the user 702, as well as access information for the user's garage and uses the delivery preferences and access information to schedule a delivery. Information regarding a delivery is provided to the user 702 via the moveable barrier operator application 701 as well as the delivery person 802 via the delivery services application 801.

Once one or more partner accounts are paired to the account of the user 702, the user 702 may view orders 906 made through the partner 905 on the application 701, as shown in FIG. 11C. Each order 906 can be selected to alter or input delivery instructions. To input delivery instructions, the user taps on the order 906 which opens a menu 910 allowing the user 702 to input delivery instructions as shown in FIG. 11D. For example, the delivery instructions may include primary instructions describing a specific location within the garage 14 to place the package 810. The instructions may also include alternative instructions for when the barrier operator systems 12A, 12B will not open for the delivery person 802. Potential reasons for the barrier operator systems 12A, 12B not opening include technical issues, such as a power outage or network connectivity failure. Alternatively or additionally, the moveable barrier operator systems 12A, 12B may refuse to open under certain circumstances such as based on a lock-out feature wherein actuation of the movable barrier operator is disallowed by a resident of the premises. For example, the moveable barrier operator system 12A monitors the status of the associated passageway door 49. If the passageway door 49 is unlocked, the moveable barrier operator system 12A transmits a control signal to the passageway lock 50 to lock the passageway door 49. If the passageway door 49 cannot be locked, e.g., if the passageway door 49 is determined to be open or if the lock 50 is determined to have experienced a power or communication failure, the moveable barrier operator system 12A transmits data to the moveable barrier operator cloud 611 indicating the passageway door 49 cannot be locked, and the moveable barrier operator cloud 611 provides alternative instructions to the second wireless device 800 of the delivery associate 802. For example, the delivery services application 801 may display an error screen 991 as shown in FIG. 12G.

As another example, the moveable barrier operator system 12A, 12B tracks whether or not the user 702 is home by using access logs and/or a sensor to detect the presence of a car or vehicle of the user 702 in the garage 14. In this example, access to the garage 14 is only granted when the user 702 is not home. When the user 702 is home, the delivery associate 802 is instructed to deliver to a front door of the user's home.

As yet another example, the movable barrier operator system 12A or a sensor associated therewith can detect whether the indicated delivery location within the garage 14 becomes obstructed and the delivery associate will be directed to deliver the package according to the alternative instructions. For example, if a spouse parks a vehicle in the previously designated parcel drop location a user could be notified (e.g., via text message or application push notification of the parked vehicle, including a photo) and update the movable barrier operator system 12A with a secondary parcel drop location on the fly.

After setting up the application 701 and pairing the account of the user 702 with the account of the partner 905, the application 701 may be used to track the status of deliveries. When the package 810 is picked up by the delivery associate 802 from a location associated with the partner 905, e.g., store or distribution center, the user 702 is notified via the application 701. When the delivery associate is en route to the garage 14 with the package 810, the application 701 displays a tracking screen 919 that includes a map 920 displaying the location of the delivery associate 802 as shown in FIG. 11E. The location of the delivery associate 802 is continuously updated using location data from the second wireless device 800 such as GPS data and/or other location data, such as location data from cell phone towers. The tracking screen 919 of FIG. 11E also displays an estimated delivery time 922. In some forms, the application 701 utilizes an existing navigation application such as an application that is native to the first wireless (user) device 700 to track the delivery as well as estimate the delivery time based on current traffic conditions. The user 702 can alter delivery instructions while the delivery is en route by using a message driver option 924 or editing delivery preferences 926. In one embodiment, the delivery services application 801 includes text-to-voice software such that the user 702 can send a human-readable message to the driver using the message driver option 924, and the second wireless device 800 reads the message to the delivery associate 802 while they are driving.

When the delivery associate 802 arrives at the garage, the user 702 is notified by the application 701 via the delivery notification screen 929 of FIG. 11F. The delivery notification screen 929 indicates that the delivery associate 802 has arrived, the time of arrival, and the name of the delivery associate 802. The screen of FIG. 11F also allows the user 702 to provide feedback 932 on (and/or a gratuity to) the delivery associate 802. The delivery notification screen 929 of FIG. 11F further provides information about the delivery. For example, the delivery associate 802 may take a picture 934 of the delivered package 810 using an optical sensor 805 of the second wireless device 800 to indicate where the package 810 is located. The captured image of the delivered package 810 may be transmitted from the delivery associate application 801 executing on the second wireless device 800 to the media cloud 612 for storage in a memory device or computer-readable medium in communication with or otherwise associated with the media cloud 612. The second wireless device 800 communicates the picture 934 to the first wireless device 700 directly or indirectly (e.g., facilitated by at least one of media cloud 612 and movable barrier operator cloud 611) for viewing by the user 702, such as via the cellular network 602, moveable barrier operator cloud 611, and internet 603. Alternatively or additionally, the user 702 may watch 936 a video of the delivery as recorded by the camera 17. In some instances, the user 702 may receive a message, alert, or notification that indicates an imminent delivery and which prompts the user to view a substantially real-time video of the delivery associate 802 entering the user's garage and depositing the delivery 810 therein. The screen of FIG. 11F may further indicate whether alternative delivery instructions were followed if the primary delivery option was not available.

In one embodiment, the user 702 is notified when the delivery is in process as shown in the delivery viewing screen 939 of FIG. 11G. The user 702 can watch live streaming video 940 of the delivery while it is happening. As described above, the user 702 can use the indicator 19 and/or the speaker and microphone 17B, 17A to communicate with the delivery associate 802. Once the delivery associate 802 leaves the garage, the user 702 can use the first wireless device 700 to transmit a command to the moveable barrier operator 12 to close the door 24. For example, the delivery notification screen 929 may include a button for transmitting the close command to the moveable barrier operator 12. Alternatively, the movable barrier operator 12A may close the garage door 24 automatically and without intervention by the user 702 after the delivery associate 802 has exited the garage 14 as discussed below. The application 701 may also display the recorded videos 942 of previous deliveries.

Regarding FIGS. 12A-12H, a method is provided for the delivery associate 802 to employ the system 600 and the delivery services application 801 to schedule a pickup and delivery of the package 810. Although the following method is described with respect to sequential actions or operations, the method may be performed with one or more actions/operations combined, omitted and/or ordered otherwise. For example, in some forms the delivery associate 802 may not need to schedule a pickup or otherwise use the pickup functionality of the delivery services application 801 to perform a delivery and that step may be omitted. In FIG. 12A, the application 801 displays a deliveries screen 949 including a pickup location 950 (e.g., street address, GPS coordinates, etc.) of the package 810 to be delivered. The delivery associate 802 can select the Take Me There option 952 to be navigated to the pickup location 950. The navigation utilizes the GPS receiver, or other position-tracking hardware, and navigation software of the second wireless device 800 to provide directions for the delivery associate 802 to reach the pickup location 950. The directions may be the most efficient route as determined by factoring in one or more of minimizing travel distance, minimizing travel time, and minimizing tolls. The pickup location 950 is the current location of the package to be delivered, such as at a storefront or distribution center of the partner retailer 905. The deliveries screen 949 further displays deliveries 954 such that a queue of deliveries to be made by or opportunities available to (but not yet confirmed or accepted by) the delivery associate 802 can be viewed. The application 801 monitors the pick-up locations and the delivery locations of each delivery queued for a delivery associate 802, and calculates the most efficient route. The most efficient route may be determined by finding a path that visits each delivery location while minimizing one or more of travel distance, travel time, and tolls. In some forms, the application 801 further uses delivery preferences, such as preferred time of delivery, and preferred starting and ending locations of the delivery associate 802 to further modify the order in which the queued deliveries 954 are made.

When the delivery associate 802 arrives at the pickup location 950, the delivery services application 801 displays information identifying the package 810 as shown in FIG. 12B. The information identifying the package 810 includes an ID number 962, a description and/or an indicium such as a barcode 964 or other identifying feature, that can be scanned via the optical detector 805 of the second wireless device 800 executing the delivery associate application 801 at the pickup location. For example, the barcode 964 may be scanned by a barcode reader operated by an associate at the pick-up location 950 and authenticated before the delivery associate 802 receives the package 810.

When the package 810 is retrieved or located at the pick-up location 950, for example the package 810 is given to the delivery associate 802 by an associate of the partner retailer 905 or retrieved by the delivery associate 802 from a designated pick-up area, the delivery associate 802 selects confirm pick up button or option 966. In one embodiment, the delivery associate 802 presses a scan package button of the package scanning screen 968 (see FIG. 12C) to cause an optical sensor 805 of the second wireless device 800 to capture, for example, a barcode (e.g., barcode 971 in FIG. 12D) of the package 810. The package pick-up scanning screen 968 shows an image 969 of the package 810 as the delivery associate frames the barcode 971 in the field of view of the camera of the second wireless device 800.

The second wireless device 800 sends a signal to the movable barrier operator cloud 611 (and/or the partner cloud 610) indicating the delivery associate 802 has picked up the package. The signal includes data regarding the barcode 971 captured by the camera of the second wireless device 800. The movable barrier operator cloud 611 (and/or the partner cloud 610) confirms that the ID number 962 and/or barcode 964 correspond to the product ordered by the user 702. If the correct package 810 has been picked up, the movable barrier operator cloud 611 sends a signal to the first wireless device 700 alerting the user 702 of successful pickup. The movable barrier operator cloud 611 may also send a confirmation signal to the second wireless device 800 confirming the correct package 810 has been picked up which permits the delivery services application 801 to advance to a navigation screen substantially similar to the navigation screen 919 shown in FIG. 11E. If the correct package has not been picked up, the movable barrier operator cloud 611 may send a signal to the first wireless device 700 notifying the user 702 and may send an error signal to the second wireless device 800. The error signal may prevent the delivery services application 801 from advancing to the navigation screen until the correct package 810 has been picked up.

Once the delivery associate 802 has picked up the correct package 810, the application 801 navigates the delivery associate 802 to the delivery location 973. When the delivery associate 802 arrives at the delivery location 973, he once again scans the package 810 using a package delivery scanning screen 970 as shown in FIG. 12D. Once the optical sensor 805, such as a camera, has framed barcode 971 in the field of view of the second wireless device optical sensor 805, as shown by display 973A, the delivery associate 802 presses a scan package button or option 972. The application 801 captures the image shown in the display 973A and transmits data regarding the barcode in the captured image to the moveable barrier operator cloud 611 (and/or partner cloud 610) which carries out a validation process involving comparing the received data to stored data associated with the package 810 to be delivered to that location. The validation process may be a multi-factor validation process that further includes confirming the delivery associate 802 is located at the delivery location 973. The location can be determined using the GPS location (or otherwise determined/triangulated location via e.g., time-delay-of-arrival) of the second wireless device 800. Additionally, to prevent location spoofing, location of the delivery associate 802 may be validated, double-checked, authenticated or otherwise verified by broadcasting or otherwise transmitting a short range wireless signal for reception by the second wireless device 800 and which the second wireless device 800 relays to the moveable barrier operator cloud 611. In one aspect, the moveable barrier operator system 12A is configured to broadcast or output a short-range signal for reception by the second wireless device 800. Example short range wireless signals include beacon signals, such as Bluetooth or BLE from the moveable barrier operator systems 12A, 12B, the exterior keypad 34, or the switch module 39. Alternatively, a Wi-Fi access point within the premises associated with the movable barrier operator systems 12A, 12B could be employed as a beacon. The second wireless device 800 receives the service set identifier (SSID) of the wireless network instantiated by the Wi-Fi access point and the second wireless device 800 communicates the SSID to the movable barrier operator cloud 611 for validation.

The multi-factor validation process further includes confirming that the passageway lock 50 is locked. If the passageway lock 50 is unlocked, the moveable barrier operator system 12A or the moveable barrier operator cloud 611 transmits a signal to the passageway lock 50 causing the passageway lock 50 to lock. If is the scanned package is determined to be the correct package for the verified location, the delivery associate 802 is enabled to open 974 the garage door via the application 801. Alternatively, once the package is confirmed as being correct, the application 801 displays a one-time access code to the delivery associate 802 to enter into the keypad 34. After the validation process is complete, the camera 17 is activated to record the actions of the delivery associate 802 as the delivery is made. That is, the camera 17 may be configured or otherwise activated to capture images and/or video of the garage door opening, the delivery person entering the garage, the delivery person depositing the package, the delivery person exiting the garage, and the garage door closing completely. In this way the user 702, homeowner, resident or package recipient is provided with a sense of security that the unattended delivery was successfully completed, that the garage (or belongings therein) was not disturbed, and that the adjacent area (e.g., attached residence) remained secure.

When the garage door 24 is opened, the application 801 displays a delivery information screen 980 to the delivery associate 802 as shown in FIG. 12E. The delivery information screen 980 may include human-readable notes, comments or instructions 981. This text note 981 may be the same as the text note 910 input by the user in the delivery note screen 909 FIG. 11D. Alternatively or additionally, the user 702 can record audible instructions 982, which are played by the application 801. As described above, instructions can also be conveyed by the speaker of camera 17, by the moveable barrier operator system 12A using the indicator 19 and/or a speaker of for example a home security/alarm system. Alternatively, the application 801 displays visual information regarding the location to place the package 810, such as on the delivery figure screen 990 of FIG. 12H. The delivery figure screen 990 includes a photograph 992 of the house or garage to aid in locating or identifying the correct address or delivery location (e.g., a specific apartment or condominium of a multi-tenant building). The delivery figure screen 990 further includes an image 994 of the position to place the package 810. The image 994 may be a photograph of a particular location within the garage 14, such as a table or step. Alternatively, the image 994 is a map or floorplan layout of the garage 14 with the preferred delivery location indicated. The user 702 may use the moveable barrier operator application 701 to create a map of the interior of the garage as well as indicate in the garage where the package 810 is to be placed. The movable barrier operator 12 may also operate the indicator 19 to indicate the desired package delivery location as discussed above.

When the delivery associate 802 gains access to the garage 14 of the user 702, the systems 10, 600 may be configured to prevent the delivery associate 802 from tampering with the movable barrier operator system 10 in order to gain unauthorized subsequent access. In an example, the movable barrier operator 12 is configured to inhibit, disregard or otherwise disable programming or learning of a new portable transmitter 30, 31 or vehicle-installed trainable transceiver (e.g., Homelink) during a delivery. To this end, the movable barrier operator 12 may ignore actuations of a programming/learn button of the movable barrier operator 12 by the delivery associate 802 such that new transmitters cannot be added to the movable barrier operator system 10. In another example, the movable barrier operator 12 may be configured with a master credential (e.g., a numeric code, alphanumeric password, a particular handheld transmitter) which, upon entry or actuation enables programming/learning of a new transmitter to the movable barrier operator 12 despite a delivery occurring.

Additionally or alternatively, the movable barrier operator 12 may notify the user 702 of actuation of a learn/program button (or other attempt to tamper with the movable barrier operator system 10 by a delivery associate). Upon receipt of such a notification, the owner 702 may provide a user input to the first wireless device 700 to cause a remedial action such as, including but not limited to one or more of: notifying law enforcement; notifying a security company; notifying the partner retailer 905; arming a home security system; outputting an alarm; and setting a vacation mode or other lock-out mode to prevent actuation of the movable barrier operator 12 by one or more transmitters. The movable barrier operator 12 may additionally query the user 702 to confirm that actuation of the learn/program button was not performed by the user 702. For example, the movable barrier operator 12 or an operator enhancement device 731 may query the user 702 via the movable barrier operator application 701 with a prompt such as a new transmitter was recently learned to your movable barrier operator; was this you? The user 702 may then respond to the query via the application 701.

In other embodiments, the first wireless device 700 and/or the movable barrier operator cloud 611 may be able to query the moveable barrier operator 12 or the operator enhancement device 731 connected thereto via the movable barrier operator application 701 after a delivery has occurred to determine how many transmitters were listed as learned before the delivery and how may transmitters were listed as learned after the delivery to determine if a new transmitter has been learned to the movable barrier operator 12. When the query indicates that a new transmitter has been learned, the first wireless device 700 may notify the user 702 accordingly via the movable barrier operator application 701.

Having received the unauthorized learn/program notification or response to the query, the user 702 may be prompted to return the movable barrier operator 12 to factory-reset conditions by: erasing all learned/programmed transmitters (including the unauthorized, newly-learned transmitter) from the movable barrier operator 12 by pressing and holding the learn/program button. Additionally or alternatively, in embodiments where the moveable barrier operator 12 is operatively connected to an operator enhancement device 731, the user 702 may cause the operator enhancement device 731 to erase information or data of only the transmitter learned last in time (i.e., the unauthorized, newly-learned transmitter) stored in a last-in-first-out (LIFO) memory or data structure. Furthermore, one or more of the foregoing-mentioned remedial actions and/or factory-reset may be taken automatically (i.e., without intervention by the owner 702) via one or more entities of the movable barrier operator system 10.

In one aspect, the movable barrier operator 12 may be configured during deliveries to enter a polite block mode and decline a delivery associate's attempt to program/learn a new unauthorized transmitter. That is, during the polite block mode the movable barrier operator 12 appears (to the delivery associate) to perform a successful learning/programming operation such that the new unauthorized transmitter is recognized. However, after the delivery associate 802 has exited the garage, the movable barrier operator 12 ignores the seemingly-learned/programmed new unauthorized transmitter. Security data such as pictures, video, and/or audio captured by camera 17 within the garage 14 may additionally provide evidence or proof to law enforcement or the partner retailer 905 of unauthorized tampering by the delivery associate 802.

In some embodiments, the movable barrier operator 12 may not, by itself, be able to communicate over a network. For example, some older moveable barrier operators 12 that have been coupled to an operator enhancement device 731 may not be able to communicate to the operator enhancement device 731 that a delivery associate has caused the movable barrier operator 12 to enter a learn mode or that a new transmitter has been learned. Additionally, the operator enhancement device 731 may not be able to disable a learning mode of the movable barrier operator 12 during a delivery by the delivery associate 802. In order to inhibit learning of a new transmitter during a delivery operation in older systems such as those described above, a different method described in more detail below may be applied.

FIG. 13 shows a garage door opener 738 including communication circuitry 742, a processor 744, and a motor 746, the garage door opener 738 is communicatively coupled to an operator enhancement device 731. As described above, a delivery associate 802 may attempt to learn a new transmitter to the garage door opener 738 during a package delivery, and garage door opener 738 may not be able to communicate to the operator enhancement device 731 to indicate that a new learning operation has occurred, nor can the operator enhancement device 731 disable the learning mode of the garage door operator 738. In such embodiments, the operator enhancement device 731 may be configured to listen for radio frequency transmissions from nearby transmitters, such as a transmitter of the delivery associate 802. Upon detecting a radio frequency transmission from an unknown or unlisted transmitter, the operator enhancement device 731 may take a remedial action such as, for example, transmitting one or more radio frequency signals to the garage door operator 738 to provide radio frequency noise to effectively jam or overwhelm the communication circuitry 742 and prevent the garage door opener 738 learning of a new transmitter. The radio frequency noise signal causes the transmitter's signal to be obscured or otherwise indistinguishable. Additionally or alternatively, the operator enhancement device 731 may notify the user 702 upon detecting a radio frequency transmission from an unknown transmitter via the movable barrier operator cloud 611.

Before a remedial action is taken, the operator enhancement device 731 may first determine whether the transmitter that transmitted the radio frequency signal during the delivery event is close enough to learn the transmitter to the garage door operator 738. This proximity determination may be performed via received signal strength indication (RSSI) thresholding. The operator enhancement device 731 may include communication circuitry 750 including a transmitter 750A configured to wirelessly communicate with one or more movable barrier operator types using different communication protocols. The communication circuitry 750 of the operator enhancement device 731 may further include a receiver to detect a radio frequency transmission having a signal strength, and a processor 748 of the operator enhancement device 731 may compare the signal strength to a signal strength threshold to determine whether the transmitter sending the radio frequency transmission is close enough to perform a learning operation. For example, the operator enhancement device 731 may detect a radio frequency transmission with a low signal strength (e.g., a transmitter for opening a movable barrier in a neighboring house) that presents little to no risk of learning to the garage door operator 738 and the operator enhancement device 731 may not take a remedial action. However, if the signal strength of the radio frequency transmission indicates that the transmitter is close enough for learning to the garage door opener, such as a transmitter within a garage associated with the garage door opener 738, the operator enhancement device 731 may take a remedial action such as communicating a radio frequency signal or a burst of radio frequency signals to create noise and interfere with or otherwise inhibit the communication circuitry 742 of the garage door operator 738 from learning a new transmitter.

Additionally or alternatively, the operator enhancement device 731 may also classify and store different lists of transmitters in a memory 749 thereof. For example, known transmitters that have been learned to the operator enhancement device 731 may be stored in a data array such as a white or safe list such that they present no concern of learning during a delivery operation. Other transmitters with radio frequency signals that are detected often, such as transmitters for opening movable barriers of neighboring houses, may be categorized on a grey list. The white and grey lists may be stored in a memory 749 of the operator enhancement device 731 or the movable barrier operator cloud 611. If the operator enhancement device 731 detects a radio frequency signal for the first time during a delivery operation (e.g. a transmitter ID portion of the transmitter signal is not listed on the white or grey lists), and the signal is determined to be close enough to perform a learning operation, the operator enhancement device 731 may be configured to communicate one or more radio frequency signals to the garage door operator 738 to create interference and inhibit learning of the new transmitter. Although the operator enhancement device 731 may not be able to directly disable a learning mode of the garage door operator 738, learning of a new transmitter may be inhibited via the radio frequency noise caused by the radio frequency signal sent therefrom.

FIG. 14 shows a flowchart of a process for inhibiting learning of a new transmitter in an embodiment where the garage door opener 738 is not configured to communicate with the operator enhancement device 731. In step 761, the operator enhancement device 731 causes the garage door opener 738 to open the associated garage door in response to the operator enhancement device 731 receiving a delivery open command from the movable barrier operator cloud 611. In step 762, the operator enhancement device 731 listens for and detects a radio frequency transmission from a transmitter and determines proximity to the garage door opener 738. The operator enhancement device 731 may determine proximity to the garage door opener 738 based on, for example, received signal strength indication thresholding. The step 762 may also include determining whether the transmitter is authorized, such as by comparing the transmitter ID of the radio frequency transmission to the white and grey lists. Then, in step 764, the operator enhancement device 731 may inhibit learning of the new transmitter by causing the communication circuitry 750 of the operator enhancement device 731 to communicate one or more radio frequency signals to inhibit learning of the transmitter when the transmitter is determined to be within a threshold proximity.

As described above, learning of a new transmitter may be inhibited in embodiments where the movable barrier operator 12 is able to communicate over a wireless network to either disable a learning mode thereof or erase one or more learned transmitters as well as in embodiments where garage door opener 738 may not be able to communicate over a wireless network by itself, but is communicatively connected to the operator enhancement device 731.

Once the package is placed in the indicated location, the delivery associate 802 presses the next button/option 983 (see FIG. 12E) in order to display a delivery confirmation screen 984 as shown in FIG. 11F. The delivery associate 802 confirms 985 he delivered the package and he is outside of the garage door. The delivery associate 802 has the option to close 986 the garage door. In some forms, the door closure is automatic. The movable barrier operator 12A or the second wireless device 800 may close the garage door 24 when the second wireless device 800 is a predetermined distance away (e.g., defined by a predetermined physical or logical boundary) from the moveable barrier operator 12A by using the location data of the second wireless device 800, by using a short range wireless signal (such as a Bluetooth or BLE signal), by geofencing, after a predetermined amount of time of the delivery associate 802 confirming delivery, and/or when the optical obstruction detection components (constituted by optical emitter 42 and optical detector 46) or infrared motion detectors (e.g. of camera 17) indicate that the delivery associate 802 has left the garage 14. Once it is confirmed that the delivery associate 802 has left the garage 14 and the garage door 24 is closed, the camera 17 ceases capturing security data. If the passageway lock 50 was locked upon the arrival of the delivery associate 802, the moveable barrier operator 12 or the moveable barrier operator cloud 611 transmits a signal to the passageway lock 50 causing the passageway lock 50 to unlock.

In one embodiment, the camera 17 captures an image of the package 810. The image is transmitted to the moveable barrier operator cloud 611 (and/or media cloud 612) which compares the image to stored data representing the size and shape of the package to confirm that the package 810 is in the image. Image analysis of the garage interior as captured by the camera 17 could be performed by media cloud 612 and/or moveable barrier operator cloud 611 to determine whether or not the contents of the garage have changede.g., a new object has unexpectedly been left in the garage by the delivery agent, or a previously-existing object has been altered damaged, moved or removed altogether. Such image analysis could prove useful for loss or damage prevention by demonstrating or supporting a contention that the delivery associate stole property from or damaged property within the garage. The image analysis can further be used to confirm the package 810 was delivered to the correct location or position/point within the garage 14. If the moveable barrier operator cloud 611 determines that the package 810 was placed in the wrong location within the garage 14, such as within a parking area, an alert is provided. The alert may notify the user 702 to prevent or substantially reduce the risk of the package 810 being damaged by the user's car during parking.

In one example, the alert is local (e.g., within or adjacent to the garage 14) and may be a visual and/or audible notification. Indeed, the alert may be one or more of a flashing light, a specific-colored light, a sound (e.g., buzzer), and a human-readable message provided by at least one of the movable barrier operator 12, the keypad 34 and the switch module 39. The alert may be one-time, periodic, recurring or persistent. That is, the alert may continue while the garage door 24 is opening, until the door is again closed. Alternatively, the alert may repeat multiple times (e.g., each time the garage door 24 is opened) until the user 702 stops or otherwise clears the alert such as by actuating in-garage hardware or a graphical user interface element displayed via the moveable barrier operator application 701 on the first wireless device 700. In an aspect, the switch module 39 may be adapted (or replaced) to provide delivery alerts. For example, a specific delivery-alert button on switch module 39 may: be actuated by a delivery associate 802 to confirm delivery, to close the garage door 24 (e.g., after a delay that permits the delivery associate to exit the garage), and to cause output of the alert; be actuated by the user 702 after delivery to clear the alert. The alert can be transmitted remotely, for example to the first wireless device 700 of the user 702 as well as to additional users with moveable barrier accounts and/or wireless devices associated with the garage 14 such as via messaging including SMS, email, push notifications and the like. Alternatively, the moveable barrier operator 12A, 12B will not open the associated garage door 24 while the package 810 is in a location that will interfere with parking. In still further embodiments, the moveable barrier operator 12A, 12B uses partial opening of the garage door 24 (e.g., providing the vehicle driver a peek inside) along with visual and/or auditory indicators (such as flashing lights and an alarm) to indicate to the vehicle driver that there is an object (i.e., the delivered package or parcel) in the driver's parking space.

Once the delivery is completed, the application 801 displays information about the next delivery, such as the pickup location 950 in FIG. 12A. Additionally, the moveable barrier operator cloud 611 transmits confirmation to at least one of the user 702 and the partner cloud 610 confirming delivery.

As described above, in some situations the moveable barrier operator 12 cannot open the garage door for the delivery associate 802. In these instances, the screen 991 of FIG. 12G is displayed instructing the delivery associate 802 to follow the alternate delivery instructions. The alternate instructions are those provided by the user in the screen 909 of FIG. 11D. Such instructions may include: depositing the package in a different location (e.g., back porch); retrying delivery at a later time or different day; leaving the package with a next-door neighbor; and the like.

The delivery associate 802 described above may be a person using the second wireless device 800. In alternative embodiments, the delivery associate 802 is a robotic associate, such as a delivery drone. The robotic associate runs software that communicates with the moveable barrier operator cloud 611 to facilitate deliveries in a way similar to the application 801. The robotic associate may be an unmanned aerial vehicle/device, an unmanned land-based vehicle/device, an unmanned water-based vehicle/device, or combinations of the foregoing.

In the method described above, the delivery services system 600 is utilized to facilitate delivery of the package 810 to the garage 14. In an alternative method, the system 600 grants temporary access to the garage 14 to a delivery associate 802 to pick up a package. The application could be used, for example, for the delivery associate 802 to return the package 810 to the storefront or distribution center of the partner retailer 906. The descriptions, indicators, and validation described above to aid the pickup of package 810 from pickup location 950, is used to identify the package 810 to the delivery associate 802 for pickup from the garage 14.

As another example, the delivery services application 801 may run on an infotainment system of the vehicle of the delivery associate 802.

Although method steps may be presented and described herein in a sequential fashion, one or more of the steps shown and described may be omitted, repeated, performed concurrently, and/or performed in a different order than the order shown in the figures and/or described herein. It will be appreciated that computer-readable instructions for facilitating the methods described above may be stored in various non-transitory computer readable mediums as is known in the art. Those skilled in the art will recognize that a wide variety of modifications, alterations, and combinations can be made with respect to the above described examples without departing from the scope of the invention, and that such modifications, alterations, and combinations are to be viewed as being within the ambit of the inventive concept.